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Severely dehydrated skin - Any advice? Dr. T?

 
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marionette



Joined: 14 Dec 2014
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sun Dec 14, 2014 7:04 pm    Post subject: Severely dehydrated skin - Any advice? Dr. T? Reply with quote

Hello. Newbie Question! My skin is uncomfortably tight, dry and flaky & covered in a million fine lines :( Especially in winter. It hurts when I smile, when I frown... I'm in my mid 30's but I look so much older... I can understand the difference between dry and dehydrated skin (I think I have both) and the properties of humectants, emollients & occlusives. A long time ago, I read some very bad things about hyaluronic acid which really made sense at the time and adding dry climate (in wintertime) to that... I was against humectants in general. I tried applying oils immediately after cleansing, I tried pure squalene, I tried formulating my own simplistic face creams (coconut / argan / rosehip oils with floral waters and sorbitan olivate / cetearyl olivate & grapefruit seed extract = pH 5.5)... And although, my extremely sensitive skin doesn't react as much, within a couple of hours, the oils (depending on which I'm using) just sit on top and I'm all dried up! My skin suffers the most in my working environment. I'm so frustrated I have tried reconsidering HA/niacinamide/PCA/glycerin/urea etc. etc. but then I read something like this:
Quote:
Water on the skin can bloat the dead skin cells on the top surface and can make the barrier appear more moisturized and temporarily reduce the appearance of lines. Again, some are shifting to the argument that applying water to the skin not only changes the PH of the skin by making it more alkaline (water has a PH of 7 while natural skin is around 5) but also interrupts the body's natural exfoliation process which in turn makes your skin drier looking if humectants are used for a long time
on this forum, which is what I believed for the longest time, and I'm scared off them again... Do I have any other options? Would actives that repair the lipid barrier (such as ceramides and phytosterols) be what was missing from my oily regimen to prevent transepidermal water loss? Should I give that practice a second try? I would really appreciate your input... thank you and sorry for the long post :)
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drtodorov
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Joined: 10 Dec 2004
Posts: 3256

PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2014 10:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Knowing some basics about moisturizing is important. See smartskincare.com/bestpractices/moisturizing.html

Ceramides may be worth a try, they can be applied in a cream or taken as a supplement of both.

Also, as a short term treatment, a cream with panthenol may be worth a try. Just keep in mind that panthenol is probably unsuitable for long term use. See smartskincare.com/treatments/topical/panthenol.html

Sometimes certain simple moisturizers may be more effective than fancy ones, especially in low humidity environment. In particularly, in low humidity environment, ingredients that hold+seal moisture may help, such as a combination of dimethicone and colloidal oatmeal (e.g. found in regular Aveeno moisturizer).
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HannaFolkes



Joined: 23 Dec 2014
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2014 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

drtodorov wrote:
Knowing some basics about moisturizing is important. See smartskincare.com/bestpractices/moisturizing.html

Ceramides may be worth a try, they can be applied in a cream or taken as a supplement of both.

Also, as a short term treatment, a cream with panthenol may be worth a try. Just keep in mind that panthenol is probably unsuitable for long term use. See smartskincare.com/treatments/topical/panthenol.html

Sometimes certain simple moisturizers may be more effective than fancy ones, especially in low humidity environment. In particularly, in low humidity environment, ingredients that hold+seal moisture may help, such as a combination of dimethicone and colloidal oatmeal (e.g. found in regular Aveeno moisturizer).
Why is it bad in the long term though?
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drtodorov
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Joined: 10 Dec 2004
Posts: 3256

PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2014 12:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It might be bad long term because panthenol stimulates the proliferation of fibroblasts and thus might cause them to hit the Hayflick limit and become senescent sooner.
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drtodorov
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Joined: 10 Dec 2004
Posts: 3256

PostPosted: Fri Sep 11, 2015 4:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To really tell with some certainly one would need a molecular biology lab and both treatment and control group.
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