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pomegranate extract and seed oil good for the skin

 
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jamesherried



Joined: 07 May 2005
Posts: 784

PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2006 1:38 pm    Post subject: pomegranate extract and seed oil good for the skin Reply with quote

Here's some information on pomegrantate from another skin-care discussion forum on another website. Dr. Howard Murad, by the way, in his books claims that pomegranate extract is his favorite skin care ingredient, even though he admits that even it can't do it all (no ingredient can). The study below mentions the benefits of not only the extract (from the peel and juice), but also the benefits of pomegranate seed oil.

The water soluble extracts from the peel and juice are good for the dermis and the oil-soluble extracts from the seeds are good for the epidermis.

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J Ethnopharmacol. 2006 Feb 20;103(3):311-8. Epub 2005 Oct 10.

Pomegranate as a cosmeceutical source: Pomegranate fractions promote proliferation and procollagen synthesis and inhibit matrix metalloproteinase-1 production in human skin cells.

Aslam MN, Lansky EP, Varani J.

Department of Pathology, The University of Michigan Medical School, 1301 Catherine Road/Box 0602, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

Pomegranate (Punica granatum) is an ancient fruit with exceptionally rich ethnomedical applications. The peel (pericarp) is well regarded for its astringent properties; the seeds for conferring invulnerability in combat and stimulating beauty and fertility. Here, aqueous fractions prepared from the fruit's peel and fermented juice and lipophilic fractions prepared from pomegranate seeds were examined for effects on human epidermal keratinocyte and human dermal fibroblast function. Pomegranate seed oil, but not aqueous extracts of fermented juice, peel or seed cake, was shown to stimulate keratinocyte proliferation in monolayer culture. In parallel, a mild thickening of the epidermis (without the loss of ordered differentiation) was observed in skin organ culture. The same pomegranate seed oil that stimulated keratinocyte proliferation was without effect on fibroblast function. In contrast, pomegranate peel extract (and to a lesser extent, both the fermented juice and seed cake extracts) stimulated type I procollagen synthesis and inhibited matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1; interstitial collagenase) production by dermal fibroblasts, but had no growth-supporting effect on keratinocytes. These results suggest heuristic potential of pomegranate fractions for facilitating skin repair in a polar manner, namely aqueous extracts (especially of pomegranate peel) promoting regeneration of dermis, and pomegranate seed oil promoting regeneration of epidermis.

PMID: 16221534 [PubMed - in process]
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drtodorov
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Joined: 10 Dec 2004
Posts: 3177

PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2006 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree, the data are suggestive of potential benefits, but this is just a test tube study. Lots of things that look promising in a test tube fail to show benefits in human trials. Still, that's interesting.
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jamesherried



Joined: 07 May 2005
Posts: 784

PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2007 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's an excerpt form an article about the overall health benefits of pomegranate from the current issue of the LEF (Life Extension Foundation) publication.

Pomegranate Supports the Skinís Underlying Structure

Topical application of pomegranate has been shown to promote skin health via several mechanisms. For example, by suppressing lipid peroxidation in the skin, pomegranate helps shield against damage induced by ultraviolet light.20 In animal studies, pomegranate seed and fruit extracts significantly reduced the incidence and number of skin tumors in the animals after an experimental cancer-provoking challenge.21,22 Pomegranate inhibits two inflammatory enzymes, cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase, which may help protect the skin against the age-accelerating effects of inflammation.23 Pomegranate extract also protected human skin cells against the increase in NF-kB induced by ultraviolet-A light, suggesting a role for pomegranate in preventing skin cancer.24


Other studies have demonstrated that pomegranate helps reverse visible signs of aging by promoting a moderate thickening of the skinís outer layer, known as the epidermis.25 Pomegranate fruit extract also provides nutritional support for fibroblast cells in the skinís dermis, which lies below the epidermis; fibroblasts produce collagen and elastin, the critical structural fibers that provide the skin with support and flexibility. Pomegranate extract also increased dermal cell proliferation and collagen synthesis at the same time.25

In addition, pomegranateís phenolic compounds effectively promote wound healing. Indian researchers noted that a topical pomegranate cream produced an average 35% reduction in the number of days required for complete recovery from an excision wound.26

Pomegranate extract thus helps protect the skin against the threats of ultraviolet light and inflammation, while supporting its underlying structure and helping to restore its youthful appearance and function.

Conclusion
Pomegranate is fast becoming one of todayís most talked-about nutrients. With emerging evidence indicating that it works via several mechanisms to remove plaque from human arteries, retard cancer growth, and promote more youthful-looking skin, pomegranate may soon be regarded as an essential nutrient. Its concentrated blend of powerful phytonutrients appears to confer profound protection against atherosclerosis, cancer, and other degenerative conditions. Health-conscious adults seeking to optimize their defense against these and other lethal diseases of aging should consider making pomegranate a part of their daily anti-aging regimen.
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LeeAng



Joined: 15 Feb 2007
Posts: 8
Location: philippines

PostPosted: Thu Feb 15, 2007 8:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Could be promising because of the ellagic acid content. Murad uses this as an oral sunguard to reinforce sunscreen but not as a substitute to suncreen
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jamesherried



Joined: 07 May 2005
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually my interest in pomegranate is currently leaning more towards its possible potential as an MMP inhibitor, as indicated by the study done at the University of Michigan Medical School, although it's also supposed to have strong antioxidant properties of course.
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drtodorov
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 2:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you have a reference to that MMP inhibition study?
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jamesherried



Joined: 07 May 2005
Posts: 784

PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

drtodorov wrote:
Do you have a reference to that MMP inhibition study?


Unfortunately,I don't have one right off. I just obtained the information from another website that has a skincare discussion forum similar to this one. The site is run by a women named Carol Demas, author of the book "How to Make Your Own Effective Cosmetic Treatments". That book also had the formulation for a creatine serum. The author's degrees are in chemical engineering if I remember correctly. The difference between her approach to making your own skincare products and the DIY approach listed here is that her approach is more complicated and time-consuming and requires more equipment than the DIY approach available here. But i still feel that the book has some useful information. For example, she has a list of all of the commonly used skincare ingredients (such as alpha-lipoic acid, grapeseed extract, green tea extract, niacinamide, etc.) and tells you what you need in order to dissolve each one(eg-lipoic acid is only fully dissolvable in oil, niacinamide in water, grape seed extract in propylene glycol, etc.). but that's off the topic now in regards to pomegranate extract as an MMP inhibitor.
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bbda



Joined: 28 Dec 2018
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2019 2:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pomegranate seed oil works on the outside to minimize the appearance of lines and signs of aging; internally, pomegranate seed oil is a dietary supplement rich in healthy dietary fats and omega-3's. Naturally, a diet rich in healthy fats, vitamins, and anti-oxidants gives skin the building blocks it needs to look radiant and young. This oil protects hair from pollution that will help in the treatment of dry and dull hair.

chiltanpure.com/product/pure-pomegranate-oil-for-hair-skin
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sunilverma33333



Joined: 28 May 2019
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2019 3:10 am    Post subject: Pomegranate for skin Reply with quote

Pomegranate for skin is a rich source of vitamin C, which research has proven is effective in treating dull and dry skin. When applied topically on a regular basis, it can reduce skin roughness. Also, around 82 percent of pomegranateís volume weight is water and thereby itís effective in keeping you hydrated.
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