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DIY anti-aging cream help...

 
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Discohouse



Joined: 18 Oct 2006
Posts: 75

PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 7:56 am    Post subject: DIY anti-aging cream help... Reply with quote

Dr. Todorov, I'm a 25 year old male, and I want to do the best I can for my skin now. I'm not sure whether I would benefit more by using a CoQ10/Idebenone cream to slow down the aging process, or another anti-oxidant cream such as stated in your DIY package containing Alpha Lipoic Acid, Green Tea Extract, Vitamin E, and Grapeseed Extract. I've heard many good things about CoQ10/Idebenone, but is it for me? I've read your article on skin care fitting your age, and I know that I'm too young to use Vitamin C and Tretinoin cream, since my skin is still producing enough collagen. I know CoQ10/Idebenone helps the skin cells in many ways as do many other anti-oxidants, and it's all very confusing in which way each anti-oxidant protects different parts of the cells. What would be best for my skin for my age??
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jamesherried



Joined: 07 May 2005
Posts: 784

PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 1:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's good to know that there is no one ingredient that can "do it all" in terms of keeping your skin young. Even CoQ10 can't do it all, nor can idebenone. Also, I wouldn't assume that just because you're 25 you can't benefit from Vitamin C or even tretinoin. It's easier to prevent skin damage and keep the skin young than it is to reverse the effects of aging once they've taken place.
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jamesherried



Joined: 07 May 2005
Posts: 784

PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2007 1:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since Dr. Todorov hasn't replied to this, I'll tell you what think based upon my current level of awareness. Antioxidants work best when used together, and the effects can then be synergistic. For example,you need Vitamin C to recycle Vitamin E (according to Dr. Lester Packer that's Vitamin C's primary role as an antioxidant) and I think you need Vitamin E to recycle Vitamin A. That's probably why it's often recommended that A-C-E always be used together. So what do you need to recycle Vitamin C? I think alpha lipoic acid might do that and maybe the OPCs in grape seed extract or Pycnogenol, although I'm not sure. We know that the OPCs in grape seed extract and Pycnogenol enhance the effectiveness of Vitamin C, but whether that's because they recycle Vitamin C or due to something else, I don't know. We just know that Vitamin C works better with the OPCs. Also, there's evidence that Vitamin E works better not only with Vitamin C, but also with CoQ10. In fact, Dr. Packer( in his book The Antioxidant Miracle) says that the "big 5 antioxidants" are Vitamin E, Vitamin C, alpha lipoic acid, CoQ 10 and glutathione, and the 5 of them work synergistically, so ideally you need all of them together.
So based upon the above info , here's my recommendation. These are all DIY formulations. Apply a Vitamin C-Pycnogenol (or Vitamin C -grape seed extract) serum in the evening (before bed) and wait for at least 15 minutes before applying anything else(to allow the Vitamin C to absorb). Then on top of that, apply a DIY formuation for the fat-soluble ingredients, which would contain Vitamin A (retinol), Vitamin E, CoQ10, alpha-lipoic acid and lycopene(in teh right amounts). I would even try adding lutein/zeaxanthin to that formula, based upon current evidence as to it's beneficial effects on the skin. And the base I would recommend for that fat-soluble formulation would be either sea buckthorn oil or coconut oil(virgin, cold pressed). Sea buckthorn has more evidence in terms of skin benefits, but it's also more expensive. I recently started using coconut oil to make that formulation, and the R-alpha lipic acid dissolves perfectly and quickly in coconut oil. I mention that because a lot of people on here seem to have trouble finding a way to dissolve alpha lipic acid, and I found that the coconut oil works for that. Also, coconut oil is supposed to be good for your skin anyway, although not as good as sea buckthorn oil. In any case, I think using coconut as a base is preferable to using the creams out there that contain harmful ingredients and no beneficial "active" ingredients.
If in your case you don't think your skin needs fixing, all of the above would be to keep your skin young, not to reverse the signs of aging. You also have to remember that just becuse your skin doesn't "appear" to need fixing on the surface doesnt' necessarily mean your skin doesn't need fixing below the surface. I've often read the collagen breakdown actually starts in most people around the age of 20, but it just may not be readily apparent yet, because the process is gradual. So chances are, you may already be experiencing collagen breakdown, and you just can't tell yet. If so, now is the best time to arrest the problem , and hence the use of a Vitamin C serum.
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drtodorov
Site Admin


Joined: 10 Dec 2004
Posts: 3177

PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2007 11:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

James, thanks for your post. I could never get around to answering all the questions. Your posts are always thoughtful and knowledgeable.
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jamesherried



Joined: 07 May 2005
Posts: 784

PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Dr. Todorov. If you disagree with any of the information I post, please let us know. I'm writing all of this based only upon my current level of awareness, which of course is limited.
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drtodorov
Site Admin


Joined: 10 Dec 2004
Posts: 3177

PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 11:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I may not always have time to post comments even if I disagree with something, but I think the community understands that not all info in the posts is hard facts. Much of it is opinions.
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Discohouse



Joined: 18 Oct 2006
Posts: 75

PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2007 2:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you apply retinol on top of vitamin C, won't that be irritating to the skin?
Plus, doesn't vitamin C need to be at least 10% concentration, and retinol should be used in a better form called Tretinoin? If so, these two shouldn't mix because of irritation. What effective concentrations do you recommend to not cause irritation?

This is what I'm currently using during the daytime:
1% idebenone mixed with small amounts of grape seed extract, vitamin E (tocophenols and tocotrienols), lycopene, alpha lipoic acid, pomegranate seed oil, astaxanthin, lutein, and ascorbyl palmitate mixed in a base cream. For my eyes I use Neostrata's green tea eye cream with 4% gluconolactone (a mild exfoliater similar to glycolic acid or lactic acid). I read in Dr. Todorov's info pack for the eyes that green tea is one of the best things because it's has some anti-inflammatory properties to help reduce morning puffiness. After a few minutes I apply my sunscreen containing SPF 60 for UVB protection, and PPD 28 for UVA protection. I use La Roche-Posay Anthelios XL containng octocrylene, titanium dioxide, avobenzone, mexoryl XL, and mexoryl SX. It's the strongest available UVA and UVB sunscreen in Canada. After half-hour, I apply a silicone mattifier gel to absorb the greasiness of the my sunscreen such as Monistat's chafing relief powder-gel.

At night, I use just the following:
1% DMAE dissolved in a base cream together with alpha lipoic acid. Then for my eyes I use again the Neostrata green tea eye cream, and gluconolactone.

How does this all sound to you?
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jamesherried



Joined: 07 May 2005
Posts: 784

PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Discohouse wrote:
If you apply retinol on top of vitamin C, won't that be irritating to the skin?
Plus, doesn't vitamin C need to be at least 10% concentration, and retinol should be used in a better form called Tretinoin? If so, these two shouldn't mix because of irritation. What effective concentrations do you recommend to not cause irritation?

This is what I'm currently using during the daytime:
1% idebenone mixed with small amounts of grape seed extract, vitamin E (tocophenols and tocotrienols), lycopene, alpha lipoic acid, pomegranate seed oil, astaxanthin, lutein, and ascorbyl palmitate mixed in a base cream. For my eyes I use Neostrata's green tea eye cream with 4% gluconolactone (a mild exfoliater similar to glycolic acid or lactic acid). I read in Dr. Todorov's info pack for the eyes that green tea is one of the best things because it's has some anti-inflammatory properties to help reduce morning puffiness. After a few minutes I apply my sunscreen containing SPF 60 for UVB protection, and PPD 28 for UVA protection. I use La Roche-Posay Anthelios XL containng octocrylene, titanium dioxide, avobenzone, mexoryl XL, and mexoryl SX. It's the strongest available UVA and UVB sunscreen in Canada. After half-hour, I apply a silicone mattifier gel to absorb the greasiness of the my sunscreen such as Monistat's chafing relief powder-gel.

At night, I use just the following:
1% DMAE dissolved in a base cream together with alpha lipoic acid. Then for my eyes I use again the Neostrata green tea eye cream, and gluconolactone.

How does this all sound to you?


I believe you can combine Vit C and retinol without irritation, but then it depends on your skin. Some people with sensitive skin can't use either Vitamin C (the L-ascorbic acid form) or even retinol, but again it depends on the individual. You also have to know that retinol is not the same as tretinoin (which is found in Retin-A). Tretinoin is an acid that is more effective than retinol for removing wrinkles, but it also has greater risk for irritation. In you case, you might just want to use the Vitamin C (at least 10%) and the retinol. And I would eliminate the ascorbyl palmitate, since it hasn't been shown to have any effects on repairing or rebuilding collagen, and if you're using Vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) you don't need the ascorbyl palmitate anyway. Most of the other ingredient sound good.
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mrslid



Joined: 09 Apr 2010
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sun Apr 11, 2010 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Discohouse may I ask what base cream you are using. I'm currently trying to find one.

Thanks for the info on the sunscreen. I'm in Canada as well and have been on the search for a good one. It sounds like it is quite greasy? My skin is on the dry side so maybe it will still be OK. I imagine the use of a primer before I apply makeup should make it workable.
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