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Questions about emu oil
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LoveBuzz



Joined: 13 May 2014
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 9:17 am    Post subject: Questions about emu oil Reply with quote

I bought some emu oil to try out after you mentioned it in a thread where I asked about a moisturiser that didn't contain panthenol. In fact I'm wearing it right now.

I read on the Internet the following:

"The monounsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid (Omega 9) is the major fatty acid in emu oil. This fatty acid is a known enhancer for transport of bioactive compounds into the skin, and thus the ability to be absorbed quickly and penetrate deeply when applied topically."

This is consistent with others who have written that somehow emu oil "pushes down" the topicals on the skin.

Can you provide some insight into this, if it's true, what it means? I'd really appreciate it.


---

Little off-topic, but I was looking also into rosehip oil and coconut oil but it looked like emu oil would be best. Do you think you could write an article at some point comparing the different 'oils' and their viability? For example, rosehip oil seems to in essence be some kind of hydrating vitamin-a oil, which would make it somewhat superfluous for anyone already using retin-a / tazorac?

The other thing I wondered is you mention it's important to check that a moisturiser lasts for 24 hours. So what does this mean for the various oils if used in a hydrative capacity?


Sorry for the long post. I always appreciate your point of view on this stuff.
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LoveBuzz



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PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 9:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

More on how it "pushes products" into the skin:


"liposomes greatly enhances their penetration, residence time, and ultimately... effects. A significant drawback to liposomal formulas recently developed by Pharma and the Bio-Tech is that they are exceedingly expensive. "

Emu Oil is supposedly a natural, and cheap liposome.
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drtodorov
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 10:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Emu oil is not a liposome. Liposome is a heterogenous entity made of water oil and stabilizer (usually emulsifier). Emu oil is just oil with skin-friendly composition. That said, it does appear to somewhat enhance penetration of oil-soluble actives, although some other oils may be good at it as well, such as coconut oil.

Yes, an ideal moisturizer should last 24-hours but even 12-hours would be good as most moisturizers last far less.

The reason oil can be moisturizing is that it is hydrophobic and prevent thus prevents transdermal water loss. However, since many oils tend to be absorbed relatively quickly be the skin, they often do not make long-lasting moisturizers, at least when used alone.
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LoveBuzz



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 12, 2014 4:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

drtodorov wrote:
Emu oil is not a liposome. Liposome is a heterogenous entity made of water oil and stabilizer (usually emulsifier). Emu oil is just oil with skin-friendly composition. That said, it does appear to somewhat enhance penetration of oil-soluble actives, although some other oils may be good at it as well, such as coconut oil.

Yes, an ideal moisturizer should last 24-hours but even 12-hours would be good as most moisturizers last far less.

The reason oil can be moisturizing is that it is hydrophobic and prevent thus prevents transdermal water loss. However, since many oils tend to be absorbed relatively quickly be the skin, they often do not make long-lasting moisturizers, at least when used alone.


That's interesting. What would you recommended as an ideal usage of emu or coconut oil in order to maximise its moisturising effects as well as duration?

Would applying a sunscreen 30 minutes after the oil in the mornings work to lock it in somehow?
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drtodorov
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 12, 2014 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For moisturizing purposes, emu oil is probably more lasting that coconut oil but you can try both and see what works better for you. But as I said, emu oil alone is not an ideal moisturizer.

Whether sunscreen can "lock-in" moisture depends on its composition. For example, one way to lock in moisture is to combine an appropriate polysilicone (e.g. dimethicone) with a hygroscopic agent, such as colloidal oatmeal or hyaluronic acid. For example, Aveeno is based on combining dimethicone and colloidal oatmeal. There are probably others using the similar formulations.
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micka



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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2014 9:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is emu oil good for oily skin?
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drtodorov
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2014 10:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oily skin typically does not need moisturizing as it produces enough of its own emollients.
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LoveBuzz



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 19, 2014 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

drtodorov wrote:
For moisturizing purposes, emu oil is probably more lasting that coconut oil but you can try both and see what works better for you. But as I said, emu oil alone is not an ideal moisturizer.

Whether sunscreen can "lock-in" moisture depends on its composition. For example, one way to lock in moisture is to combine an appropriate polysilicone (e.g. dimethicone) with a hygroscopic agent, such as colloidal oatmeal or hyaluronic acid. For example, Aveeno is based on combining dimethicone and colloidal oatmeal. There are probably others using the similar formulations.


Does Aveeno use d-panthenol?

As I've stated previously the sole purpose for me looking into emu oil is that I don't want to use a moisturiser that has any potentially pro-ageing properties. Are you aware of any such moisturisers?
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drtodorov
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 20, 2014 12:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

At least the regular Aveeno does not.
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LoveBuzz



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PostPosted: Sun Jul 20, 2014 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

drtodorov wrote:
At least the regular Aveeno does not.


May I ask, is that what you're using yourself right now?
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drtodorov
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 21, 2014 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

During the dry time of the year (heating season), I would often DIY something, but sometimes I just use regular Aveeno (with colloidal oatmeal and dimethicone) and/or emu oil.
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LoveBuzz



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PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

drtodorov wrote:
During the dry time of the year (heating season), I would often DIY something, but sometimes I just use regular Aveeno (with colloidal oatmeal and dimethicone) and/or emu oil.


I'll keep my eye out for some aveeno to try out also. Colloidal oatmeal and dimethicone is one of aveeno's variations on their moisturiser, right? Or are you adding this yourself?

I'm guessing you don't have any concerns regarding the ingredients of it?
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drtodorov
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 10:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Colloidal oatmeal and dimethicone are the key two ingredient with which classic Aveeno started. They since introduced lots of variations. Not sure how useful those are, but the regular aveeno is still based on oatmeal and dimethicone as key ingredients as far as I know.

Other ingredient in Aveeno are not ideal and added mainly to create stability and long-enough shelf-life, which is hard to avoid with commercial products.

It is possible to DIY something similar but with few unnecessary inactives (as long as it is stored at low temperatures and used up quickly), but it is not that simple. It might be worth the trouble if the regular Aveeno works well for you. But you may want to try regular Aveeno first and at least see if it addresses your problem.
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LoveBuzz



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PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2014 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

drtodorov wrote:
Colloidal oatmeal and dimethicone are the key two ingredient with which classic Aveeno started. They since introduced lots of variations. Not sure how useful those are, but the regular aveeno is still based on oatmeal and dimethicone as key ingredients as far as I know.

Other ingredient in Aveeno are not ideal and added mainly to create stability and long-enough shelf-life, which is hard to avoid with commercial products.

It is possible to DIY something similar but with few unnecessary inactives (as long as it is stored at low temperatures and used up quickly), but it is not that simple. It might be worth the trouble if the regular Aveeno works well for you. But you may want to try regular Aveeno first and at least see if it addresses your problem.


I'll follow your advice and look into a DIY after trialling avenoo for a bit.

An update regarding Emu Oil: I have to say that I strongly believe it's causing me to break out. Before using emu oil I had no active acne. Now I find each night I apply it I'm waking up with a couple spots here and there. Of course the only way to know is to stop for an extended period of time which I will seeing as the bottle is almost empty.

Is this possible? I was told emu oil couldn't cause breakouts due to its composition, absorbed easily, non-comedogenic, whatever the correct terms are


Edit: How comedogenic is dimethicone? A few websites are saying it's bad for acne. To hell with my crappy acne-prone genes >:c
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drtodorov
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2014 4:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is a vary large individual variation as to what ingredients may cause one to break out. Emu oil does not usually cause breakouts but that doesn't mean that it cannot. In some people, almost any oil could cause breakouts. So, it is trial and error until you find what agrees with your skin.
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